Climate in Crisis: Finding Hope & Taking Action

“We humans are the reason why climate is changing, but that also means our future is in our hands.” – Katharine Hayhoe, Saving Us⁠ If you are anything like me, you start your day by checking your email. You receive the latest headlines in those emails – some good, some bad. But the bad news sticks with you. Like this one from Environment by Impact, stating that February 2024 “was the hottest February in recorded history, making it the 9th month in a row we’ve seen record-breaking temperatures”. A feeling of doom takes over, and looking at the clock, you realize you’ve only been awake for five minutes.  I’m aware that doomscrolling is a bad habit. Still, in the age of technology and instant information at our fingertips, it can feel like I’m missing out or uninformed if I don’t constantly check my notifications. Maybe you relate to this feeling of “eco-anxiety”, a chronic feeling of environmental doom. You’re not

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Song of Springtime: Golden-cheeked Warbler

Known for its distinctive black-and-gold plumage and beautiful calls, the arrival of the Golden-cheeked Warbler signifies springtime in Central Texas.  In late March, male Golden-cheeked Warblers are first to arrive at their nesting grounds in the Texas Hill Country, establishing territories while perched underneath the canopy cover provided by old-growth juniper-oak woodlands.  Golden-cheeked Warblers are socially monogamous, meaning they pair exclusively for a breeding season. Courtship behavior is rarely observed but involves the female collecting nesting material as the male sings and spreads his wings and tail, sometimes offering nesting material to his potential mate. Together, they build their small nests in the upper part of the tree, approximately 16-23 feet off the ground. Various materials are woven together, such as juniper bark, twigs, leaves, grass, lichen, seeds, moss, feathers, hair, wool, and spider silk. During nesting season, a female Golden-cheeked Warbler may lay up to 5 eggs, which she incubates for 12 days. As fledglings, and throughout their life,

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Petition: Listing Atlantic Horseshoe Crab as an Endangered Species

A recent petition, led by The Center for Biological Diversity with 22 partner organizations, seeks to list the Atlantic horseshoe crab as an endangered species under NOAA Fisheries’ Endangered Species Act. According to an article published on February 14, the petitioners state that horseshoe crab populations have crashed in recent decades due to overharvesting and habitat loss, putting them in danger of extinction across a significant portion of their region as threats are likely to persist. This sentiment is echoed by A Rocha’s Conservation Project team in Florida as they contribute to research on horseshoe crabs. In their interactive StoryMap “Crawling through Spacetime,” our team outlines present threats to the Atlantic horseshoe crab, including the detrimental impact of beach development on their habitat and overharvesting for use as bait or in medical testing. For more information on the Atlantic horseshoe crab, you can check out our Creature Feature. You can support our horseshoe crab research and other marine conservation efforts

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Cultivating Wonder: Introducing A Rocha USA’s VBS Curriculum

Wild Wonder helps children learn and wonder about God and nature, get outside, and spark their imaginations as they explore God’s good creation. Created by A Rocha USA, Wild Wonder is a Vacation Bible School (VBS) style curriculum designed for children aged 4-10. Each year in the four-year curriculum includes five days of songs and devotions, science and nature lessons, guided play, and exploration. Campers sing in worship, hear what the Bible says about God and creation, and take a daily Nature Break to listen to the world around them. They also study creation through hands-on science experiments, observation, and conservation activities. Additional crafts and games help campers experience the joy of getting to know creation and the loving God who made it all. With a curriculum rooted in Psalm 104, children are invited to delight in God as creator, redeemer, and sustainer of all things. For more information on Wild Wonder, we invite you to check out A Rocha

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